Georgette – fashionistas most loved fabric!

For those all who are interested in knowing the difference between faux georgette and pure georgette or interested in learning something new, here it goes:

Georgette fabric is a light-weighted sheer fabric that is originally made from Silk. It has a light crepe texture with highly twisted threads that give the fabric a flowing-bouncy look. Because of its light-weight, flowing nature and ability to hold heavy work without adding much weight to the attire, it is the most favourite fabric for designers. Pure Georgette fabric is thin in nature and most expensive when compared to other fabrics. As a result, there has been introduction of faux georgette that is considered to be at least 3 times cheaper than the pure georgette.

Faux georgette has polyester weaving done in the fabric that gives it a real hard roughness to it. It gives a crackling kind of feel when rubbed and is quite heavy in comparison to the pure georgette. As a result it gives a synthetic feel and also the attires in faux georgette do not appear flowing or moving on its own.

It is important to note that a lot of shops and designers are using faux georgette while pricing it at the cost of the pure georgette to make huge margins on the attire. Faux georgette loses its colour in a few washes or dry clean and hence, customer ends up paying a huge amount for the not-so-expensive attire.

Pure georgette does not require much special maintenance, however, these key methods should be only resorted to to make sure that the fabric is long lasting in its best condition:

  • Hand wash
  • Use of a light detergent
  • Dry in a shaded location

To rent out pure georgette ethnic wear, do visit Kyasa – The Rental Boutique at HSR Layout.

Trivia:

Georgette essentially originated in France in the early 90s and because of its tenderness was adopted early on by the Royal families. With the advent of modern machineries and techniques, its cost became lesser that made it affordable for the larger section of people.

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